User Tools

Site Tools


synthesis:main

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
synthesis:main [2017/11/14 02:50]
polite
synthesis:main [2017/11/14 02:51] (current)
polite
Line 9: Line 9:
   * **Audio** - bipolar voltage oscillating fast enough to create sound in a speaker. It should be noted that audio signals in a eurorack system are not compatible with standard consumer and pro audio devices, where most audio in '​normal'​ realm is around 1/1.2V peak to peak, modular signals are often up to 10V, and so can either cause damage to standard audio devices, or at least heavily distort or sound muddy. This is to say nothing of impedance matching. Always use a module designed to send audio out to a speaker or headphones rather than plugging them straight into your VCO.   * **Audio** - bipolar voltage oscillating fast enough to create sound in a speaker. It should be noted that audio signals in a eurorack system are not compatible with standard consumer and pro audio devices, where most audio in '​normal'​ realm is around 1/1.2V peak to peak, modular signals are often up to 10V, and so can either cause damage to standard audio devices, or at least heavily distort or sound muddy. This is to say nothing of impedance matching. Always use a module designed to send audio out to a speaker or headphones rather than plugging them straight into your VCO.
   * **CV** - any signal of any speed used for controlling parameters in the system. Can move or be static, positive or negative voltage. ​   * **CV** - any signal of any speed used for controlling parameters in the system. Can move or be static, positive or negative voltage. ​
-  * **Trigger** - Usually a spike of voltage going from 0-5v. Modules expecting a trigger will detect the voltage passing a threshold somewhere between that range, and perform an '​action'​ each time it happens. These triggers can be regular, erratic, fast, slow. It really depends on how the module itself responds to the triggers, and it's often interesting to experiment with using audio signals for triggering modules. ​+  * **Trigger** - Usually a spike of voltage going from 0-5v. Modules expecting a trigger will detect the voltage passing a threshold somewhere between that range (often at 1v, but it depends on the design), and perform an '​action'​ each time it happens. These triggers can be regular, erratic, fast, slow. It really depends on how the module itself responds to the triggers, and it's often interesting to experiment with using audio signals for triggering modules. ​
   * **Gate** - pretty much the same as a trigger, except that the gate remains '​ON'​ for the length of time that the voltage remains about it's threshold limit. One common use for this is for sustaining a note with an envelope. Where a trigger is just a moment in time.    * **Gate** - pretty much the same as a trigger, except that the gate remains '​ON'​ for the length of time that the voltage remains about it's threshold limit. One common use for this is for sustaining a note with an envelope. Where a trigger is just a moment in time. 
   * **Clock** - is a regular sequence of triggers or gates (usually a square wave or short pulse) to allow modules to keep time.    * **Clock** - is a regular sequence of triggers or gates (usually a square wave or short pulse) to allow modules to keep time. 
synthesis/main.txt ยท Last modified: 2017/11/14 02:51 by polite